HS Newsbeat: Major Milestone Reached Against Infectious Diseases

By Bobbi Nodell

A collaboration involving UW Medicine researchers reached a major milestone toward helping investigators create drug therapies and vaccines for some of the world’s major infectious diseases.

The group solved 1,000 protein structures from more than 70 infectious disease organisms.

Understanding protein structures -- the basis of drug therapy and vaccines -- is key to understanding how infectious diseases are different from us, said Dr. Wesley Van Voorhis, head of the Division of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the UW School of Medicine.

30 Exceptional UW Students Receive Global Travel Fellowships

The Department of Global Health awarded 30 international travel fellowships this spring to support the projects and research of graduate and professional students and medical residents at UW for the next academic year. Students from varied disciplines across the University, including global health, social work, psychology, and pharmacy, will travel to 16 countries pursuing fieldwork experience. Projects range from implementing a harm-reduction program in Vietnam to developing evaluation tools for emergency medical and trauma response systems in sub-Saharan Africa.

Science Daily: Brain Fights West Nile virus in Unexpected Way

By Leila Gray

Insect-transmitted viruses, like Powassan and West Nile, which can attack the brain in some cases, are becoming a growing public health concern. Medical scientists are trying to understand how brain cells try to fend off invading viruses.

Recently they have learned that, in a turnabout, a biochemical self-destruct trigger found in many other types of cells appears to guard the lives of brain cells during infection with West Nile virus. 

The Daily: Syrian-American Physician Discusses Crisis in Syria

By Allison Dubbs

People discuss Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and ISIS, but rarely the 20 million Syrian citizens affected by the nation’s ongoing conflicts. According to Dr. Zaher Sahloul, there is a huge lack of compassion for those affected by the Syrian Civil War, and people are avoiding moral responsibilities.

UW Regents Approve Central Campus Site for Population Health Building to House Collaborative Research and Teaching

By Victor Balta, UW News and Information

The University of Washington Board of Regents on Thursday approved the location for construction of a new building to house the UW’s Population Health Initiative. The centrally located site will bring together the work of the UW’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, Department of Global Health and parts of the School of Public Health while creating easy access for collaborators from other departments across campus and guests from around the world.

NewsBeat: Common Malaria Meds Pose No Undue Risk in Early Pregnancy

Global team finds that artemesinin therapies are as safe as quinine for women in first trimester

By Sarah C.B. Guthrie 

Artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs), medications widely used against malaria, are safe to administer to women in their first trimester of pregnancy, according to research published today. ACTs had previously been recommended at that stage of pregnancy only in life-saving circumstances. 

UW Community Stands Up For Science, Joins Large March in Seattle

Celebrating Earth Day this past weekend, over 20,000 people showed up to March for Science in Seattle on April 22 at Cal Anderson Park. The March lasted four hours, and among the crowd of students, advocates, professors, researchers, parents, concerned citizens, and even WA Governor Jay Inslee, was a large contingency from the University of Washington community.

MPH Student Focuses on Gender Inequality in India

From the time she was 11 years old, Halima Freudberg dreamed of serving in the Peace Corps. Hailing from Philadelphia, she studied Psychology and Gender and Sexuality Studies at nearby Bryn Mawr College.  After graduation, Halima realized her dream of joining the Peace Corps and travelled to a rural village in Cameroon.

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