The Global Health Leadership Council plays a critical role in helping to ensure that we sustain, develop and grow to improve our ability to deliver improvements in global health and increased economic and community development. The Council’s purpose is to advance our Department’s mission by helping DGH leadership, faculty, staff and students connect with and engage people, groups and organizations in the community that are interested in global health; advising us on key questions of strategic importance as we further develop UW’s global health programs; and assisting in securing philanthropic support for high priority research, education and capacity building efforts. The Leadership Council members are a select group of local and international leaders and volunteers who partner with DGH stakeholders to facilitate achieving set goals.

Select from the following:
Julie Nordstrom

Co-Chair, Julie Nordstrom is an active community volunteer. She is currently working on global health initiatives with the University of Washington and is a founding Co-Chair of the Department of Global Health’s Leadership Council. Nordstrom has previously served on the board of Seattle Children's Home, the advisory board of Child Haven, and volunteered at Seattle Children’s. Nordstrom was formerly an associate for the law firm of Stafford, Frey, Cooper and Stewart, where she worked in the construction and surety division. She was also a law clerk for Justice James Dolliver of the Washington Supreme Court. She earned her law degree from Seattle University and her bachelor’s degree in political science from the UW.

Brooks Simpson

Co-Chair, Brooks Simpson has over 30 years of experience in medical sales and marketing. He retired from Physio-Control after 20 years of service including senior management positions as Vice President of World Wide Marketing, International, and North American Sales.  During his tenure at Physio-Control, he was involved with the divestiture from Eli Lilly, sale to Bain Capital, IPO in 1996, and acquisition by Medtronic in 1998. In 1999, Mr. Simpson founded Pacific Rim Medical Systems, a distributor of cardiovascular devices.  Mr. Simpson is also chairman of the R. Hunter Simpson Foundation and a board member for the Washington Research Foundation.  The R. Hunter Simpson Foundation has funded home building in Guatemala for single mothers; supports 120 high school students in West Benin Africa; the Hamomi Learning Center, a school for orphans in Nairobi; and UW School of Nursing fellowships in Vietnam, Indonesia, India, and Peru.  The foundation was the initial supporter for the UW Global Health’s Comprehensive Outpatient Center in Gondar, Ethiopia.

Theiline Cramer

Theiline "Ty" Cramer is an active community volunteer. With an MA in International Relations from the Maxwell School of Public Administration at Syracuse University, and a graduate certificate in Global Health from the UW, her interest in global public health stems back to her youth where she spent summers as a vaccination project volunteer in Central and South America.  Her recent board involvement includes immediate past Chair and current Trustee of the Board of Trustees for Lakeside School and Board Member Emeritus of the IslandWood Environmental Learning Center. Previously, Ty was involved as a supporter and advisory member to Water First and the Chief Seattle Club. She is also the co-founder of Heyday Farm on Bainbridge Island, an agro-ecological enterprise to model sustainable financial and environmental farming practices. Her professional experience focuses on women’s health as a doula and certified childbirth educator.

Charlie Nolan

Charlie Nolan is a Clinical Professor of Epidemiology at the School of Public Health, with research interests in the clinical epidemiology of tuberculosis locally, nationally, and internationally. Dr. Nolan worked in public health in Seattle and internationally for 30 years, focusing on the epidemiology, prevention and control of communicable diseases, especially tuberculosis. During his tenure at Seattle Public Health, Dr. Nolan participated in the teaching and training programs of the University of Washington’s Schools of Medicine and Public Health and Community Medicine, where he is Clinical Professor of Medicine. He is past Chair of the Health and Human Services Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis, and Past President of the Board of Trustees of the International Union North American Chapter. He has been a member of the World Health Organization Green Light Committee for access to second line anti-tuberculosis medications, and from 2004-09 provided oversight to the Gates Foundation on the CREATE Project, a $50 Million grant to an international consortium to improve the control of TB and HIV/AIDS in South Africa, Zambia, and Brazil.

Roberta Perry-Garrison

Roberta (Robyn) Perry-Garrison is vice president, BCA Partnering for Success.  In this role she is responsible for integration and execution of 787 and sustaining programs supplier cost reduction. Previously, Robyn served as vice president of Supplier Management for BDS Mission Systems and Global Services & Support (GS&S). In this role, Perry-Garrison leads the BDS Mission Systems supplier teams and holds responsibility for GS&S Supplier Management, as well as the Supply Chain Management Capability Center for GS&S. She oversees an organization with more than 1,400 employees at 10 sites across the United States, Australia, and the United Kingdom, providing Supply Chain Management services for more than $4 billion of material annually.  Prior to that, she served as the vice president of Boeing Military Aircraft (BMA) Supplier Management with responsibility for more than 850 Boeing employees and about $9 billion in annual product and service procurements with hundreds of strategic and merchant suppliers worldwide. She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in business administration with a concentration in Finance from Seattle University, and an Executive Master of Business Administration from the University of Washington.

Carrie Rhodes

Carrie Rhodes is the owner of CDR Farms, which is managed by Rhodes River Ranch, which is dedicated to breeding, raising and training future world champion performance horses. Carrie was a founding member of the Seattle UNICEF Advisory Circle.  She now serves on the US Fund for UNICEF’s Northwest Board and is a volunteer leader of The Eliminate Project for the US Fund for UNICEF. Carrie attended Scripps College and Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing. Carrie also serves on the Board of Trustees for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Northwest Chapter and on the Board of trustees for Billings Middle School. She has two daughters and one son.

Ezra Teshome

Ezra Teshome is an entrepreneur who has earned accolades worldwide for his philanthropic endeavors and efforts within Africa to impact the lives of children. He is passionate about global health issues, particularly focusing on the eradication of polio and bringing clean water to villages in rural Ethiopia. He has served notably on the board of several organizations, as well as a university. Professionally, Ezra has built a successful insurance and financial services business for over 35 years. He is also very involved in his local Ethiopian community, where he helped build the first church and establish the community center. As a testament to his contributions to society, Ezra has been awarded with many of the highest honors in his community, including the World Affairs Council World Citizen Award; Seattle University’s Alumni Community Service Award; the Rotary Service above Self Award; International service award for world polio free Award, Martin Luther Jr. Distinguished service Award from UW Science center and being named a Time Magazine Global Health Hero. Ezra served as the District Governor 2013-14 of Rotary District 5030. He is married to Yobi and they have 4 children and 3 grandchildren.

Maurizio Vecchione

Maurizio Vecchione is the Sr. Vice President of Global Good and Research at Intellectual Ventures (IV). In this role, he oversees Global Good, IV’s collaboration with Bill Gates to invent and deploy technology specifically focused on improving life in developing countries, as well as the research and operations of the IV Laboratory and Institute for Disease Modeling. Mr. Vecchione most recently served as CEO of Arrogene, which is commercializing a new nanotechnology platform for cancer targeted therapeutics and diagnostics, and as CEO of telemedicine pioneer CompuMed. Under Mr. Vecchione’s leadership, Global Good and the IV Lab are engaged in cutting-edge research and invention for the benefit of humanity around global health and global development priorities. In global health, Global Good and IV Lab are involved in new diagnostic technologies for infectious diseases, such as malaria and tuberculosis, enhanced vaccine delivery technologies, maternal and child health, as well as IV’s Institute for Disease Modeling efforts to shape infectious disease policy and programs with data-driven analysis.