HS Newsbeat: What Causes Child Stunting? Steps Toward Understanding

By Ashlie Chandler

About 162 million children worldwide under age 5 are considered too short for their age, a growth failure called stunting. Despite efforts to improve child growth, stunting has been difficult to prevent and treat, negatively impacting child health and development.

Researchers from the University of Washington School of Public Health studied what causes child stunting and developed a framework to help deliver effective interventions in low-resource settings.

Nature Research Honors Julie Overbaugh, PhD, for Lifetime of Mentoring

Julie Overbaugh, PhD, Affiliate Professor in the UW Department of Global Health, scientist and member at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and Endowed Chair of Graduate Education, received the lifetime achievement Nature Award for Mentoring in Science and a $10,000 prize in December. Nature hosts these annual awards to champion the importance of mentoring and inspiring a generation of young scientists.

ASSPH: Brad Wagenaar Receives Partners in Health Grant for Implementation Science in Liberia

Dr. Bradley Wagenaar, Acting Instructor of Global Health and graduate of the University of Washington’s PhD program in epidemiology, recently received a nine-month, $45,000 grant from Partners in Health (PIH) to help catalyze applied research activities in Liberia.

In his new role as director of research for PIH, Dr. Wagenaar will guide development of an applied implementation science and health systems research program. PIH has worked in Liberia since the Ebola outbreak in 2014, delivering primary care through a number of clinics in Maryland, Grand Gedeh and Grand Kru counties.

UW Has 29 Faculty on ‘Highly Cited Researchers’ List for 2016

Twenty-nine University of Washington faculty members are among a list of the year’s most highly cited researchers in the natural and social sciences, including Christopher Murray and Mohsen Naghavi of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, and Michael Gale, Alan Lopez and Michael Brauer from the Department of Global Health. 

CBS News: Where You Live May Determine How You Die

By Dennis Thompson

What causes a person’s death depends in large part on where they spend their lives, concludes a new county-level analysis of U.S. mortality data.

Armed with this sort of information, county and city health departments can focus their efforts on the specific problems affecting their communities, said lead researcher Ali Mokdad, Professor of Global Health at the University of Washington.

Reuters Africa: From Gene Editing to Death Traps, Seattle Scientists Innovate in Race to End Malaria

By Kieran Guilbert

When Kayode Ojo first fell sick with malaria as a young boy in Nigeria, his grandfather shunned modern medicine, venturing into the bush to search for herbs and plants to treat the disease.

Having succumbed to malaria a further 50 or more times in his life, the United States-based scientist, now in his forties, is determined that his research - to develop a drug to stop transmission from humans back to mosquitoes - will help to eradicate the deadly disease.

UW Research in Clinical Medicine Ranked No. 2 Globally

In the 2016 Academic Ranking of World Universities for clinical medicine and pharmacy, the University of Washington has moved up to No. 2 in the world (from No. 3 in 2015) and is now second to only Harvard University.

The list, published by the Shanghai Ranking Consultancy, evaluates more than 1,200 universities. Shanghai Ranking is recognized for basing its rankings on objective indicators, such as the number of alumni and staff who have won Nobel Prizes, highly cited researchers and publications in top medical journals.

UW Today: UW Remains Fifth in Global Ranking of University Achievements in Scientific Research

By Victor Balta

Continuing a recent string of noteworthy accolades, the University of Washington held its place at No. 5 in the world on the National Taiwan University Ranking of Scientific Papers, which was released Friday. The ranking is based on performance of scientific papers in three major categories — research productivity, research impact and research excellence.

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