What It Will Take for The World to Keep Getting Better

By Vanessa Bates Ramirez

Compared to life 100 years ago, life these days is pretty good by many measures. You’ve probably heard the statistics: poverty and infant mortality are down, life expectancy is up, and infectious diseases are being controlled, if not cured. In short, more humans than ever before are having their basic needs met, and it’s undeniable that the world is getting better.

The Washington Times: Women's Bacteria Thwarted Attempt at Anti-HIV Vaginal Gel

By Lauran Neergaard

Creating new HIV prevention tools for women has proven frustratingly slow and researchers have found another hurdle: bacteria in the reproductive tract.

A new study published Thursday examined what stalled an early attempt at an anti-HIV gel, and found certain types of vaginal bacteria broke down the protective medication before it had time to work.

The Lancet: Profile of Jared Baeten, Aiming to See Off HIV

By Tony Kirby

"The last person that I train, I want that training to be in something other than HIV", says Jared Baeten. Speaking to The Lancet Infectious Diseases from the HIV Research for Prevention Conference (HIVR4P) in Chicago, IL, where he brought a 12-strong team of his researchers, Baeten explains: “When that time comes, I want HIV to have been eliminated as public health threat, so we can focus on other diseases”. 

SPH: Targeted Testing for Children of HIV-Infected Adults

By the School of Public Health

Testing the children of HIV-infected adults already receiving care may efficiently diagnose HIV-infected children before they exhibit symptoms, according to researchers from the University of Washington School of Public Health.

By referring HIV-infected parents to have their children tested, researchers revealed many untested older children and found that prevalence of HIV was high. This new active referral model significantly increased the rate of pediatric testing with limited additional costs to health systems.

NewsBeat: Antiretrovirals Pose Low Risk to Nursing Mothers, Babies

Study involves researchers with UW International Clinical Research Center

By Bobbi Nodell

Researchers have found that breastfeeding mothers taking the antiretroviral drugs tenofovir and emtricitabine have a low risk of side effects. The study, published in PLOS, was conducted by colleagues at the UW International Clinical Research Center and partners in Kenya, Uganda and Johns Hopkins University.

Family Practice News: Oral HIV PrEP Also Protects Against Herpes

By Bruce Jancin

DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA – Oral antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) against HIV also reduces the risk of acquiring herpes simplex virus type 2, according to research presented at the 21st International AIDS Conference.

“Given the limited interventions for primary prevention of HSV-2, efficacy against HSV-2 provides additional benefit to oral PrEP,” observed Connie Celum, MD, professor of global health and medicine at the University of Washington, Seattle.

UW Awarded DREAMS Innovation Challenge to Bring PrEP to Adolescents in Kenya

The University of Washington is one of 56 DREAMS Innovation Challenge winners* announced on Monday by the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR); Janssen Pharmaceutica NV (Janssen), one of the Janssen pharmaceutical companies of Johnson & Johnson; and ViiV Healthcare.

NewsBeat: Vaginal Ring Better against HIV than Initial Results Showed

New data analyses finds that a monthly vaginal ring containing an antiretroviral drug called dapivirine can cut women’s HIV risk by more than half and, in some, by 75 percent or more.

One of the researchers, Jared Baeten, a University of Washington professor of epidemiology, medicine and global health, presented the results Tuesday at the AIDS 2016 conference in Durban, South Africa.

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