The Atlantic: How Back Pain Took Over the World

By Olga Khazan

The newest iteration of the Global Burden of Disease study, which tracks the prevalence of deaths and diseases worldwide, contains some good news: On average people are living about a decade longer than they were in 1980. But there’s a catch: Health hasn’t improved as fast as life expectancy overall, which means that for many, those long, final years are spent hobbled by illness and disability.

Professor Theo Vos is quoted.

Humanosphere: A New Way to Measure Progress in Global Health

By Sean McKee, special to Humanosphere

The world has made tremendous progress in global health during the past 25 years, reducing the impact of some major killers like HIV or, well, childbirth, and greatly expanding access to drugs or vaccines to prevent and treat many millions of the poorest people on the planet.

But sustaining that rate of progress is likely to get a lot harder. And measuring success, or failure for that matter, is likely to get more important.

Seeding Innovation: Global Health Faculty Get a Boost from Global Innovation Fund

This year’s Global Innovation Fund awardees represent a number of disciplines across 29 schools, colleges and programs. The funds are managed by the Office of Global Affairs, who had to choose from a record 95 applications. Only 26 applications were awarded funds, and of those, eight involve Global Health faculty.

Awardees were selected through a highly competitive process managed that awards seed grants to projects in two areas: a) innovation in study abroad and b) innovation in global engagement and partnerships.