COVID-19 Raises Risk for Women Who are Obese and Pregnant (UW Medicine Newsroom, quotes Kristina Adams Waldorf and Erica Lokken)

The novel coronavirus can severely affect pregnant women who are overweight or obese before becoming pregnant, new research suggests.

Published today by the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the findings show that women who contract the virus may have a higher incidence of preterm birth.

Multisite Trial Early Data Suggests Remdesivir is Effective (UW Medicine Newsroom, Interview with Helen Chu)

Remdesivir, a non-specific antiviral drug that was originally tested against Ebola, has been shown to be effective against the new coronavirus in a preliminary data analysis, as reported by the National Institutes of Health. The UW School of Medicine was one of the sites in the National Institutes of Health trial. Dr.

Match Day Goes Virtual (UW Medicine - Quotes August Longino)

The COVID-19 crisis has brought a whirlwind of changes that have impacted everyone in our community — including this year’s graduating class of medical students at UW School of Medicine. 

In the last few weeks, the students were pulled from their clinical rotations early.

Then, the difficult and unprecedented decision was made to hold the School’s Match Day ceremony online.

Zika Brain Damage May Go Undetected in Pregnancy

By Leila Gray / UW Medicine

“Current criteria using head size to diagnose Zika-related brain injury fail to capture more subtle brain damage that can lead to significant learning problems and mental health disorders later in life,” said Dr. Kristina Adams Waldorf, Professor Global Health and Obstetrics and Gynecology in the University of Washington's Schools of Public Health and Medicine, who specializes in maternal and fetal infections. “We are diagnosing only the tip of the iceberg.”

Citiscope: How Seattle Became A World Leader in Global Health And Development

By Gregory Scruggs

In schools across India this week, schoolchildren are eating pasta disguised as rice kernels and boosted with extra nutrients. At a health clinic in Honduras, a nurse is sterilizing medical instruments with chlorine made from an easy-to-use portable kit. In Kenya, thirsty workers will come home from long days on the job and drink water from reliable, low-cost filters.

HS Newsbeat: National Doctors Day, UW Medicine Physician stats

Thousands of academic faculty and community physicians are affiliated with the patient care, educational and research endeavors of UW Medicine. They work for their patients and to improve the health of the public locally, regionally and globally.

For National Doctors Day, March 30, 2017, UW Medicine put together a statistical and informational snapshot. 

Read about UW Medicine's doctors

EurekAlert: Why Some People May Not Respond to the Malaria Vaccine

Creating protective immunity against the early liver stage of malaria infection is feasible, but has been difficult to achieve in regions with high rates of malaria infection. Many current malaria vaccines target the pre-erythrocytic stage of infection in the liver, however in endemic regions, increased blood stage exposure is associated with decrease vaccine efficacy, challenging current malaria vaccine efforts. 

Teaching Moments: An Interview with David Townes

David Townes, UW associate professor of medicine (emergency medicine), joined the UW faculty in 2001. He is also a public health and medical technical advisor to the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance at USAID and a medical epidemiologist in the Emergency Response and Recovery Branch at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Throughout his career Townes has worked in Antarctica, Costa Rica, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Indonesia, Jordan, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, Russia, Senegal, Tanzania, Turkey, the West Indies and Zambia.

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