How Climate Change Threatens our Health in the Pacific Northwest

Around this time last year, news outlets blared alarming headlines: Breathing the air outside was as bad as smoking several cigarettes. Wildfire haze blotted out the sun and turned the moon orange. Weather apps simply listed the forecast as “smoke.”

Just because this summer has been clear, though, doesn’t mean that the environment is doing just fine.

A Climate-focused Presidential Debate? Here’s What Moderators Should Ask

Jay Inslee, the governor of Washington state, has said climate change is the “driving motivation” for his presidential campaign; some of his opponents agree, particularly after an April CNN/SSRS poll found that 82 percent of Democrats and Democratic-leaning voters described the issue as “very important.” One of these candidates will face off in the general election against a president who ran on the assurance that “I believe in clean air. Immaculate air.

The CDC Won’t Tell You One Reason Mosquito-borne Disease is on The Rise

By Nicole Karlis / Salon

According to the Centers for Disease Control monthly report, vector-borne diseases have nearly tripled since 2004.

Mosquito and tick-borne diseases are on the rise in the United States. That’s according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who has issued its monthly Vital Signs report just in time for summer 2018.

Tracking the Health Consequences of Climate Change

By Grace Harmon / The Daily, UW

As this past year has shown, Seattle’s temperate climate is by no means immune to the drastic shifts in weather brought about by climate change. Last January alone brought four crippling winter storms and Seattle saw its coldest winter since 1985. This summer broke the 1951 record for longest time without rainfall at 52 days, which led to multiple, long-lasting wildfires and hazardous air quality in the region.

CleanTechnica: Higher Carbon Dioxide Levels May Result in Less Nutritious Food

By Steve Hanley

Most of us learned about photosynthesis when we were in high school. Plants use carbon dioxide and sunlight to make the food they need to grow. That means higher carbon dioxide levels should be good for plants, right? Absolutely, says Republican Congressman Lamar Smith of Texas. He is a firmly committed climate change denier who is the chairman of the House Committee on Science.

CarbonBrief: Billions to Face 'Deadly Threshold' of Heat Extremes by 2100, Finds Study

By Robert McSweeney

Up to three quarters of the world’s population could be at risk from deadly heat extremes by the end of the century, a new study suggests.

The research finds that just under a third of the global population is currently exposed to heat extremes that have resulted in deaths in the past. This will increase as global temperatures rise.

Keeping global warming to less than 2C above pre-industrial levels would limit the number at risk from potentially lethal heatwaves to around half of the global population.

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