How Hurricane Ian Became So Powerful

The New York Times

New data from NASA reveals how warm ocean waters in the Gulf of Mexico fueled Hurricane Ian to become one of the most powerful storms to strike the United States in the past decade. Sea surface temperatures were especially warm off Florida’s southwest coast, allowing the storm to pick up energy just before crashing into the state north of Fort Myers.

Kristie Ebi, professor of global health and of environmental and occupational health sciences at the UW, is quoted.

Oregon to cover health-related climate expenses

AP News

Oregon is set to become the first state in the nation to cover climate change expenses for certain low-income patients under its Medicaid program, as the normally temperate Pacific Northwest region sees longer heat waves and more intense wildfires.

Kristie Ebi, professor of global health and of environmental and occupational health sciences at the UW, is quoted.

Why Is Extreme Heat So Deadly?

NPR

Heat is the deadliest weather-related hazard in the U.S. Over the last 10 years, it’s killed an average of 135 people per year. That’s more than floods, hurricanes or tornadoes, according to the National Weather Service.

Kristie Ebi, professor of global health and of environmental and occupational health sciences at the UW, is interviewed on NPR’s 1A podcast.

How to Recognize Heat Illness and Stay Cool during Extreme Weather

Scientific American

The ill effects of heat kill more people in the U.S. than those of any other weather phenomenon, according to the National Weather Service. And globally the growing number of longer-lasting and hotter heat waves because of climate change has left people more vulnerable to record-shattering highs.

Kristie Ebi, Professor of Global Health and of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences at the UW, is quoted.

Climate change: Will naming heatwaves save lives?

BBC News

Among the potential solutions that have been proposed to lower the number of fatalities in heat waves is the naming and categorizing of extreme heat events.

Kristie Ebi, Professor of Global Health and of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences at the UW, is quoted.

Cities respond to rising heat … with new hires

Marketplace

People around the world are dying from heat exposure. A few cities and towns — from Phoenix and Miami here in the U.S. to Athens, Greece — are responding by hiring “chief heat officers.” It’s a step to the future of local heat resilience as the climate continues to change.

Kristie Ebi, Professor of Global Health and of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences at the UW, is quoted.

Meet the Global Engagement Fellows

UW News

The Office of Global Affairs is excited to announce that three faculty members have been awarded Global Engagement Fellows grants for the 2022-2023 academic year. Each fellow will receive $3000 from the Global Innovation Fund to build an inclusive UW global faculty community.

Dr. Kristie Ebi, Professor of Global Health and of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, has been named a Global Engagement Fellow.

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