The New York Times: The Mystery of the Wasting House-Cats

By Emily Anthes

Most days, the back room of the Animal Endocrine Clinic in Manhattan is home to half a dozen cats convalescing in feline luxury. They lounge in their own individual “condos,” each equipped with a plush bed, a raised perch and a cozy box for hiding. Classical music plinks softly from speakers overhead. A television plays cat-friendly videos — birds chirping, squirrels scampering. Patients can also tune in to the live version: A seed-stuffed bird feeder hangs directly outside each window.

UW Today: Why Treating Animals May Be Important in Fighting Resurgent Tropical Disease

By Kim Eckhart; this story originally appeared in UW Today

As the World Health Organization steps up its efforts to eradicate a once-rampant tropical disease, a University of Washington study suggests that monitoring, and potentially treating, the monkeys that co-exist with humans in affected parts of the world may be part of the global strategy.

Seattle Times Op-Ed: Deadly Overuse of Antibiotics in Our Food Chain

A report out of the United Kingdom found that, worldwide, antibiotic-resistant bacteria could kill more people per year by 2050 than cancer kills today.

By Paul Pottinger and Bruce Speight

THROUGHOUT its history, the United Nations General Assembly has convened to discuss major global threats, including nuclear proliferation, human-rights abuses and global climate change.

UW College of Arts and Sciences: Monkeying around in Remote Indonesia

By Nancy Joseph

When Matthew Novak set foot on Tinjil Island in Indonesia this summer, it was a homecoming of sorts. Twenty years ago, Novak (BS, PhD, Psychology, 1993, 2002) participated in a month-long field study program on the remote island as a UW graduate student. He returned this year as a professor, along with four of his Central Oregon Community College students.

The Washington Post: Washington’s wildfires gave this sea otter asthma. Now she’s learning to use an inhaler.

By Sarah Kaplan

One-year-old Mishka has spent nearly all her life in the water. But fires burning miles away are threatening her health.

The young sea otter, a resident of the Seattle Aquarium, was diagnosed with asthma after inhaling smoke from this summer’s vicious wildfires, according to the aquarium.