The Guardian: Soaring Suicide and Murder Rates Compound Middle East Suffering

Research shows deaths due to violence such as homicide and sexual assault are rising much more steeply in the eastern Mediterranean region than elsewhere.

Violent acts including suicide, homicide and sexual assaults are increasing faster in the eastern Mediterranean region than in any other in the world, adding to the suffering of populations experiencing conflict and war.

The Post Star: U.S. is Not a Global Health Care Leader

By Kathleen Phalen-Tomaselli

For Vancouver filmmakers Ronan Reinart and Kate Twa, all medically necessary health care is covered by their government’s single-payer Medical Services Plan, the provincial program that covers health-care benefits for British Columbia residents.

“We pay a small monthly premium — in our case, around $100 for two — which is determined by income, and low-income folks don’t pay any premium,” Reinart said. “Elective and non-necessary procedures we pay for, but there may be tax deductions for many of these.”

Pursuit: How Death by Numbers Promotes Global Health

By Andrew Trounson

In rural Myanmar, the local midwife is at your side at the start and end of your life.

Not only is she responsible for delivering babies and registering them, she is also responsible for registering deaths and cause of death. And it’s all done the old-fashioned way, using scribbled notes that are sent back to the bureaucrats on bicycles or by mail.

Global News: One in Ten People Worldwide are Obese and the Number Keeps Growing

By Leslie Young

A new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that 12 per cent of the world’s adult population is obese and that number has been growing steadily over the last 35 years.

Not a single country has ever successfully reduced its obesity rate, according to the researchers, aside from a handful of places like Afghanistan and the Democratic Republic of the Congo where years of war have led to famine or widespread malnourishment.

UW Regents Approve Central Campus Site for Population Health Building to House Collaborative Research and Teaching

By Victor Balta, UW News and Information

The University of Washington Board of Regents on Thursday approved the location for construction of a new building to house the UW’s Population Health Initiative. The centrally located site will bring together the work of the UW’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, Department of Global Health and parts of the School of Public Health while creating easy access for collaborators from other departments across campus and guests from around the world.

Puget Sound Business Journal: Gates Foundation Invested $545 million in the Seattle area last year

By Coral Garnick

While the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is known worldwide and makes contributions around the globe, the Seattle-based nonprofit has made hefty contributions in its hometown.

An economic impact study commissioned by the foundation shows it funneled $545 million into King, Pierce and Snohomish counties in 2015 that translated into $1.5 billion in economic activity.

Reuters: Progress Uneven as Global Child Death Rates Fall

By Andrew M. Seaman

(Reuters Health) - - Deaths among children and adolescents became less common between 1990 and 2015, but not all countries benefited equally from the improvements, according to a new analysis.

Countries with low social and economic statuses shoulder a much larger child and adolescent mortality burden compared to countries with better income, education and fertility levels, researchers found.

University of Washington Population Health Initiative Receives Transformative Gift from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

FROM: Victor Balta

University of Washington

206-543-2580 balta@uw.edu

The University of Washington’s Population Health Initiative, which aims to bring together the research and resources of the UW and partners around the Puget Sound and beyond to improve the health and well-being of people around the world, has received a significant vote of support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the university announced Tuesday.

The Atlantic: How Back Pain Took Over the World

By Olga Khazan

The newest iteration of the Global Burden of Disease study, which tracks the prevalence of deaths and diseases worldwide, contains some good news: On average people are living about a decade longer than they were in 1980. But there’s a catch: Health hasn’t improved as fast as life expectancy overall, which means that for many, those long, final years are spent hobbled by illness and disability.

Professor Theo Vos is quoted.

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