Pursuit: How Death by Numbers Promotes Global Health

By Andrew Trounson

In rural Myanmar, the local midwife is at your side at the start and end of your life.

Not only is she responsible for delivering babies and registering them, she is also responsible for registering deaths and cause of death. And it’s all done the old-fashioned way, using scribbled notes that are sent back to the bureaucrats on bicycles or by mail.

Counsel Heal: How Will You Die? Odds Are It'll Be Cardiovascular Disease

By Dan Franck

A recent report in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology states that one-third of all deaths worldwide are from cardiovascular disease (CVD). In 2015 alone, 18 million people died of heart and vascular disease.

Dr. Gregory Roth, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Global Health at the University of Washington calls it "an alarming threat to global health."

...

Read the full article

Common Dreams: Global Study Shows Americans Dying from Preventable Causes at Shocking Rates

By Nika Knight

Americans are dying at a shockingly high rate from preventable causes, found a first-of-its-kind global health study published late Thursday.

The new research demonstrates that despite the fact that the U.S. has the largest economy in the world, healthcare for many of its residents is woefully inadequate. The U.S. was tied with Estonia and Montenegro, far below other wealthy nations such as Norway, Canada, and Australia, in the study's ranking of 195 countries.

Science Daily: Cardiovascular Disease Causes One-third of Deaths Worldwide

Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) - including heart diseases and stroke - account for one-third of deaths throughout the world, posing an alarming threat to global health, according to a new study. 

Countries with the greatest number of cardiovascular deaths, after accounting for population size, are found throughout Eastern Europe, Central Asia, the Middle East, South America, sub-Saharan Africa, and Oceania, researchers said. 

...

Read the full article

Christian Science Monitor: US Infant Mortality Rate Declines, but Disparities Remain

The rate of infant deaths in the United States has improved, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in a study released on Tuesday.

The infant mortality rate dropped 15 percent over the past decade, from a record high 6.86 infant deaths per 1,000 live births in 2005 to 5.82 in 2014, data show. While the new report indicates a promising development in the country’s public health, commentators say the United States has a long way to go to catch up to peer nations.

Hutch News: The Health Haves and Have Nots

By Diane Mapes

As with many studies, there was good news and bad news.

The good news:  Public health researchers from the University of Washington looked at cancer’s mortality rate county by county and found that overall, deaths from the disease dropped 20 percent during the last 35 years, falling from 240 deaths per 100,000 people in 1980 to 192 deaths per 100,000 people in 2014.

Politifact: Does Tuberculosis Top HIV/AIDS as the Deadlier Disease?

By John Greenburg

Among nations, the United States is the runaway leader in the money it spends on global health programs, and the looming question for advocates is what will happen under President Donald Trump and a Republican Congress. Nick Seymour, a Harvard junior volunteering at a health clinic in Mexico, argued for sustained spending.

Pages