Video: Preserving the Scientific Integrity of Getting to COVID-19 Vaccines: From Clinical Trials to Public Allocation

More than 5,200 viewers joined us last week for the Johns Hopkins University–University of Washington symposium “Preserving the Scientific Integrity of Getting to COVID-19 Vaccines: From Clinical Trials to Public Allocation.”

Thank you to those who watched and heard from prominent experts, including scientists from JHU and the UW, who provided insight into the scientific process around developing effective and safe vaccines for COVID-19, and the importance of maintaining scientific integrity and public trust.

Researchers Recruiting Patients for Regeneron Antibody Trial (includes Ruanne Barnabas)

UW Medicine, Fred Hutch scientists will jointly test whether the monoclonal drug can prevent infection among people exposed to COVID-19.

Researchers at UW Medicine and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center are jointly testing monoclonal antibodies created by Regeneron Pharmaceuticals to prevent COVID-19, and are starting to recruit patients.

How COVID-19 Affects Some People Long After They Become Infected with the Coronavirus (includes Jennifer Ross)

By Ryan Blethen Seattle Times staff reporter

Nearly eight months after the pandemic was declared, researchers are gaining a more complete understanding of how the new coronavirus affects people.

One thing they’re noticing as time goes on: some people diagnosed with COVID-19 feel sick long after contracting the virus.

Summary of COVID-19 Long-term Health Effects: Emerging Evidence and Ongoing Investigation

Understanding the course of patients’ recovery from COVID-19 is critical for health system planning and for guiding public health prevention efforts. At less than one year into the COVID-19 pandemic, many long-term effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection remain unknown. However, new evidence is emerging rapidly about symptom profiles and rehabilitation needs of COVID-19 survivors in the initial months of their recovery. This document is a brief summary of published evidence about the sequelae of COVID-19 and ongoing studies of its long-term health effects.

Why the Collapsing Global Birth Rate Won’t Save us From Climate Change (Quartz - quotes Kristie Ebi)

Overpopulation has been a threat to the planet since long before anyone heard of climate change.

English economist Thomas Malthus first sounded an alarm about the potential for population growth to overwhelm the planet's natural resources in 1798. The alarm rang again in 1968 with Paul Erlich's doomsday treatise "The Population Bomb," and has reverberated since in the background of the climate crisis: All else being equal, more people means more emissions, more hungry mouths, more potential victims of natural catastrophes.

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