The Seattle Times: Bill Gates: Global-Health Cuts Would Increase AIDS Deaths

 By Sandi Doughton

With more than $40 billion in assets and the world’s richest man at the helm, The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation might seem well-positioned to ride out any political storm.

But the Trump administration’s proposal to slash funding for the global health and development causes the Seattle foundation holds dear sent shivers through even the country’s most powerful philanthropy.

U.S. News & World Report: HPV Vaccine May Even Protect Women Who Never Got It

By Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter

Fewer adult women are becoming infected with human papillomavirus (HPV), a trend that includes females who have never received the HPV vaccine, a new study reports.

It appears that enough women have gotten the HPV vaccine to create "herd immunity" that will provide some protection to females who go unvaccinated, said lead researcher Dr. Abbey Berenson.

The Seattle Times: Putting an End to Intestinal Worms

By University of Washington

For two billion people around the planet, anemia, weakness and malaise are part of daily life.

These symptoms are part of living with soil-transmitted helminths – more commonly known as intestinal worms – that inhabit victims’ bellies, sapping their nutrients and stunting their physical and cognitive development.

The Guardian: Soaring Suicide and Murder Rates Compound Middle East Suffering

Research shows deaths due to violence such as homicide and sexual assault are rising much more steeply in the eastern Mediterranean region than elsewhere.

Violent acts including suicide, homicide and sexual assaults are increasing faster in the eastern Mediterranean region than in any other in the world, adding to the suffering of populations experiencing conflict and war.

ThinkProgress: Detroit Activists Want a State of Emergency Declared over Water Shutoffs

By E.A. Crunden

Activists are calling for officials to declare a state of emergency in Detroit following the release of a study connecting water shutoffs throughout the city to an uptick in illnesses.

Community organizers in Detroit brought experts together on Wednesday to discuss the research on a panel, while asserting that city health officials have not done enough to address the problem.

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