The Latest Summer Forecast Calls for Deadly Heat Waves (Popular Science, Quotes Kristie Ebi)

It’s virtually certain that 2020 will be on the top five list of hottest years on record for the planet, according to atmospheric scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. In a briefing, NOAA officials announced their three-month outlook for this summer, with above average temperatures expected across almost all of the United States. The likelihood of excessive heat is highest in the West and Northeast.

The Coronavirus Risks of Everyday Activities as Economies Reopen (Reuters, Quotes Jared Baeten)

Americans have started returning to more normal lifestyles with the end of coronavirus lockdowns. But what activities are safe?

Reuters asked five epidemiologists and public health experts to rate eleven everyday activities on a scale of 1 to 5, with 1 being a low-risk activity and 5 being a high risk activity. The scientists agreed that precautions can be taken to make all of these activities safer.

Amid Hydroxychloroquine Uproar, Real Studies of Drug Are Suffering (New York Times, quotes Christine Johnston)

President Trump’s enthusiastic embrace of a malaria drug that he now says he takes daily — and the resulting uproar in the news media — appears to be interfering with legitimate scientific research into whether the medicine might work to prevent coronavirus infection or treat the disease in its early stages.

COVID-19 Raises Risk for Women Who are Obese and Pregnant (UW Medicine Newsroom, quotes Kristina Adams Waldorf and Erica Lokken)

The novel coronavirus can severely affect pregnant women who are overweight or obese before becoming pregnant, new research suggests.

Published today by the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the findings show that women who contract the virus may have a higher incidence of preterm birth.

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