UW Students, Faculty Break Barriers and Build Bridges at the AIDS 2018 Conference

More than 30 UW researchers participated in the 22nd International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2018) — the world’s largest global gathering on HIV and AIDS — to share ground-breaking science aimed at helping to address the most pressing challenges in HIV/AIDS. The conference offered an important opportunity to strengthen policies and programs around the world that ensure an evidence-based response to the epidemic.

Are We Missing a Critical Window for Preventing Diarrheal Deaths in Children?

By Kate Pfizenmaier / Global WACh

Death from diarrheal disease is entirely preventable yet it remains the second leading cause of death worldwide in children under five. When a child arrives at a clinic with severe diarrhea in a low-income country, say Kenya, what dictates the treatment they get? How do we define the severity of their condition and when do we assume it could be life threatening? 

Washington State Should Pass Parental Leave

By Kyleen Luhrs, Alee Perkins, Rachel Shaffer, Kelsey Sholund, Manahil Siddiqi, and Rebecca Wu, students at the University of Washington schools of medicine and public health. Manahil Siddiqi is pursuing a graduate certificate in the global health of women, adolescents and children.

As students at the University of Washington School of Medicine and School of Public Health, we are concerned about the lack of paid parental leave in Washington state.

Teaching Children with Cerebral Palsy to Walk: UW Exoskeleton Project Wins $30,000 to Develop New Technology

Imagine a therapeutic device that children with cerebral palsy could wear at home to strengthen their legs and increase their mobility, eventually allowing them to walk without assistance.  Now imagine the device was low-tech and affordable, making it accessible to children around the globe who have limited or no access to expensive therapies that require robotics, supervision by a trained clinician, or invasive surgeries.

Global WACh Announces New Scientific Priorities

The Global Center for Woman, Adolescent, and Child health completed its fifth year in June 2016. A Center within the Department of Global Health, it was established to pursue scientific discovery and leadership development by breaking down traditional silos that separate disciplines. Their approach to research was framed from a lifecycle perspective -- one that views women, children and adolescents as interconnected populations that move along a shared life course.

In February Global WACh introduced three newly articulated scientific priority areas:

SPH: Targeted Testing for Children of HIV-Infected Adults

By the School of Public Health

Testing the children of HIV-infected adults already receiving care may efficiently diagnose HIV-infected children before they exhibit symptoms, according to researchers from the University of Washington School of Public Health.

By referring HIV-infected parents to have their children tested, researchers revealed many untested older children and found that prevalence of HIV was high. This new active referral model significantly increased the rate of pediatric testing with limited additional costs to health systems.

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