STREAM Study Shows Point-of-Care Viral Load Testing Can Improve HIV Outcomes

The Simplifying HIV TREAtment and Monitoring (STREAM) study, led by Global Health professor Paul Drain and recently published in The Lancet HIV, found that point-of-care HIV viral load monitoring and task shifting significantly improved viral suppression and retention in HIV care, as compared to standard laboratory-based HIV viral load testing. This study was the first randomized controlled trial to compare rapid point-of-care HIV viral load testing against standard of care lab-based HIV viral load testing, which usually takes several weeks to return results to patients.

Global Health Professor Receives Grant to Develop Antigen-Based COVID-19 Test

With a new $765,120 grant, Global Health professor Paul Drain will lead a study to develop an antigen-based COVID-19 test – as well as evaluate PCR-based tests and immunological assays – to be used at the point of care. This grant, sponsored by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, is titled “Developing and Evaluating Point-of-Care Antigen and Immunoassays for COVID-19 and Cytokine Release Syndrome among people being screened for SARS-CoV-2 infection in Seattle”.

New Research Aimed at Promoting Better Patient Adherence to HIV Medications

Paul Drain—an Associate Professor in the Department of Global Health, Medicine and Epidemiology at the University of Washington—and his research team have received a new grant from the CoMotion Innovation Gap Fund, a program intended to help bridge the gap between academic research grants and the level of development needed to obtain investment. Drain’s project is titled “Rapid test for measuring adherence to antiretroviral therapy and pre-exposure prophylaxis”.  

Point-of-Care HIV Viral Load Testing Combined with Task Shifting to Improve Treatment Outcomes (The Lancet - Includes Paul Drain, Ruanne Barnabas, and Connie Celum)

Point-of-care HIV viral load testing combined with task shifting can improve viral suppression and retention in care by up to 14% and enable rapid care decisions, suggest results of a clinical trial led by the University of Washington and the Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA).

New Project Aims to Optimize HIV Treatment in South Africa

Over half of the 37 million people worldwide living with HIV are receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART), yet only half of those people have suppressed replication of HIV with appropriate ART. A new project led by Dr. Paul Drain, an Associate Professor in the Departments of Global Health and Medicine at the University of Washington, aims to provide insight into the acceptability, feasibility, and impact of scaling-up the delivery of ART among adolescents and young adults living with HIV in community-based settings. Dr.

The New England Journal of Medicine: Preserving the Fogarty International Center — Benefits for Americans and the World

By Paul K. Drain, Ramnath Subbaraman, and Douglas C. Heimburger

The FIC [Fogarty International Center] has been instrumental in extending the frontiers of health research around the globe and ensuring that advances in science are implemented to reduce the burden of disease, promote health, and extend longevity for all people.

In the Fight to End TB, UW Establishes New Partnership in Bangladesh

By Alex Murphy

World TB Day, celebrated each year on March 24th, is an opportunity to raise awareness about the global burden of tuberculosis (TB).  The 2017 World TB Day theme is “Unite to End TB,” and some faculty from the University of Washington (UW) embodied the work by creating a new partnership in Bangladesh. 

Seattle Times: Cuba Rediscovered: US Students Get Free Ride in Cuban Medical School

By Ángel González

Cuba’s renowned health-care system, which flourishes despite the country’s poverty, still has lessons to teach the world, experts say. Hundreds of U.S. students have attended medical school tuition-free in Cuba, including a UW grad who plans on returning home to practice in underserved communities in Kitsap County.

Assistant Professor Paul Drain is quoted.

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Seeding Innovation: Global Health Faculty Get a Boost from Global Innovation Fund

This year’s Global Innovation Fund awardees represent a number of disciplines across 29 schools, colleges and programs. The funds are managed by the Office of Global Affairs, who had to choose from a record 95 applications. Only 26 applications were awarded funds, and of those, eight involve Global Health faculty.

Awardees were selected through a highly competitive process managed that awards seed grants to projects in two areas: a) innovation in study abroad and b) innovation in global engagement and partnerships.