Department of Global Health Graduates Largest Class Ever

Wednesday, June 12, 2019 marked the 12th Department of Global Health graduation since the department’s founding in 2007. This year’s celebration saw a record number of students, as 74 students received their degrees, up from last year’s total of 56. Of the 74 graduates in the Class of 2019, 62 received Masters in Public Health and 12 earned PhDs in Global Health Implementation Science, Global Health Metrics, or Pathobiology.

Student Blog: My Graduate Discovery Fellowship at the CDC

Jay Vornhagen is 2017 graduate of the Pathobiology PhD program at the University of Washington Department of Global Health. He is currently completing a postdoc with Lakshmi Rajagopal at Seattle Children’s Research Institute. During his tenure at UW he published more than any other student since the Pathobiology program began in 1990. Jay received a Graduate Discovery Fellowship to work at the Centers for Disease Control from January-March, 2017 with Mary Kamb, Associate Director for Global Activities in the Division of STD Prevention.

The Washington Times: Women's Bacteria Thwarted Attempt at Anti-HIV Vaginal Gel

By Lauran Neergaard

Creating new HIV prevention tools for women has proven frustratingly slow and researchers have found another hurdle: bacteria in the reproductive tract.

A new study published Thursday examined what stalled an early attempt at an anti-HIV gel, and found certain types of vaginal bacteria broke down the protective medication before it had time to work.

The Globe and Mail: University of Victoria Researcher Close to Developing Syphilis Vaccine

By Andrea Woo

A University of Victoria researcher says she and a colleague are close to developing a vaccine for syphilis, a disease that has reached its highest rates in B.C. in 30 years.

Microbiologist Caroline Cameron and Sheila Lukehart, a professor in the University of Washington’s department of global health, have received a nearly $3-million grant from the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health. The grant will help fund preclinical trials.

Times Colonist: As Syphilis Cases Rise, UVic Leads Search for a Vaccine

By Richard Watts

A University of Victoria microbiologist and her American colleague are looking for a vaccine to prevent syphilis, a venereal disease on the rise worldwide.

UVic’s Caroline Cameron, a professor of biochemistry and microbiology, is joining with University of Washington’s Sheila Lukehart, a professor of medicine and global health, to develop a vaccine to stop syphilis before it gets started in a body.

“It’s a preventive treatment, not a cure,” Cameron said.