CleanTechnica: Higher Carbon Dioxide Levels May Result in Less Nutritious Food

By Steve Hanley

Most of us learned about photosynthesis when we were in high school. Plants use carbon dioxide and sunlight to make the food they need to grow. That means higher carbon dioxide levels should be good for plants, right? Absolutely, says Republican Congressman Lamar Smith of Texas. He is a firmly committed climate change denier who is the chairman of the House Committee on Science.

CarbonBrief: Billions to Face 'Deadly Threshold' of Heat Extremes by 2100, Finds Study

By Robert McSweeney

Up to three quarters of the world’s population could be at risk from deadly heat extremes by the end of the century, a new study suggests.

The research finds that just under a third of the global population is currently exposed to heat extremes that have resulted in deaths in the past. This will increase as global temperatures rise.

Keeping global warming to less than 2C above pre-industrial levels would limit the number at risk from potentially lethal heatwaves to around half of the global population.

Kristie L. Ebi Authors Report on Accomplishments of US Global Change Research Program

Kristie L. Ebi, UW Professor of Global Health and Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, authored a recently published report summarizing the first 25 years of accomplishments by the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). Dr. Ebi is a member of the USGCRP National Research Council Advisory Committee and Director of the UW Center for Health and the Global Environment. 

EOS: Revived Climate Change Forum Focuses on Threats to Human Health

By Maryn McKenna

A long-planned summit on climate change and health that was abruptly canceled last month by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) got a second chance at life in Atlanta yesterday. Detached from the federal agency and cut to a third of its originally intended length, the resurrected conference likely earned much more attention than it otherwise would have.

CNN: Scientists Highlight Deadly Health Risks of Climate Change

By Jacqueline Howard

The future is expected to hold more deadly heat waves, the fast spread of certain infectious diseases and catastrophic food shortages.

These events could cause premature deaths -- and they're all related to climate change, according to a panel of experts who gathered at the Carter Center in Atlanta for the Climate & Health Meeting.