Faculty Receives $3 Million to Test One-Stop Locale for Women's Reproductive Health, HIV Prevention

Kenneth Mugwanya, an assistant professor of global health at the University of Washington School of Public Health, and his research team have received a five-year, $3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to test the effectiveness of integrating methods of HIV prevention into sexual and reproductive health services for women in Kenya.

MPH Student Supplies Bread, Coffee, and Masks to 500 UW Custodial Workers

Evalynn Romano, the Master of Public Health student in the Department of Global Health who began supporting UW custodial workers with bread, coffee, and masks last month, has now delivered supplies to nearly 500 workers on the UW campus. Romano’s efforts have reached approximately 280 custodial and recycling operations staff and 200 workers at UW Medical Center. 

DGH Faculty and Fellows Receive 2020 New Investigator Awards

The UW/Fred Hutch Center for AIDS Research is delighted to announce the 2020 New Investigator Award recipients.  The purpose of this award program is to encourage junior investigators (at a senior stage of training or recently independent) to conduct independent research, acquire preliminary data to use for exogenous grant submissions, publish, receive mentorship, and write one or more grants to obtain funding to continue their HIV/AIDS research careers.

DGH Conducts New Research on Treatments that Accelerate the Recovery of Undernourished Children

A new grant to investigators in the Department of Global Health will support the generation of evidence to improve the care of acutely unwell, undernourished children. The initial phase of this project is funded by a $1.2 million award from Oxford University and it will fund the development of a number of clinical trials within a multi-site, multi-country platform (the Childhood Acute Illness & Nutritional (CHAIN) Network).

Standing in solidarity with our Black community members

Members of the DGH Community:

Events in the past academic year have demonstrated just how important it is to commit actively to social justice and anti-racism, given clear evidence of systemic racism, police brutality and injustice in our society and the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on Black people and other people of color. We recognize the experiences of students, colleagues and friends in our community who have been excluded, disregarded, undermined, denigrated, and falsely accused because of racism, police brutality and white supremacy.

Health Sciences Common Book: "How to Be an Antiracist" by Ibram X. Kendi

Each year, the UW Health Sciences schools select a Common Book that serves as a platform for students from across health professions to engage with one another in substantive, inter-professional dialogue about pressing topics related to health equity and social justice. We're pleased to announce this year’s Common Book is How to Be an Antiracist, a No. 1 New York Times bestseller by American author and historian Ibram X. Kendi.

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