Improving weather forecasts by one degree could slash heat wave deaths

Washington Post

When temperatures are extreme, the accuracy of a weather forecast can be the difference between life and death. New research shows that even small errors in temperature predictions — as little as one degree Celsius — lead to more deaths, and that improving forecasts would save thousands of lives and billions of dollars annually.

Kristie Ebi, professor of global health and of environmental and occupational health sciences at the UW, is quoted.

When temps rise, so do medical risks — should doctors bring it up more?

NPR

An 80-plus-degree day is not sizzling by Phoenix standards. It wasn’t even high enough to trigger an official heat warning for the wider public. But research has shown that those temperatures, coming so early in June, would drive up the number of heat-related hospital visits and deaths across the Boston region.

Kristie Ebi, professor of global health and of environmental and occupational health sciences at the UW, is quoted.

Why Anemia Is Highly Prevalent Among Women In The Global South

Forbes

According to a recent study published in The Lancet Hematology, in 2021, the leading cause of anemia globally was dietary iron deficiency (66.2% of all anemia cases). Women are far more likely to have anemia than men. While approximately 444 million men are anemic, 825 million women were diagnosed with the condition.

Nicholas Kassebaum, adjunct professor of global health and of health metric sciences, is quoted.

Huge wildfire explodes in southern California and spreads into Nevada

The Guardian

A huge wildfire burning out of control in California’s Mojave national preserve is spreading rapidly amid erratic winds. The York fire erupted on Friday near the remote Caruthers Canyon area of the wildland preserve. It crossed the state line into Nevada on Sunday, and sent smoke further east into the Las Vegas Valley.

Kristie Ebi, professor of global health and of environmental and occupational health sciences at the UW, is quoted.

Record heat waves illuminate plight of poorest Americans who suffer without air conditioning

AP News

As climate change fans hotter and longer heat waves, breaking record temperatures across the U.S. and leaving dozens dead, the poorest Americans suffer the hottest days with the fewest defenses. Air conditioning, once a luxury, is now a matter of survival.

Kristie Ebi, professor of global health and of environmental and occupational health sciences at the UW, is quoted.

July keeps sizzling as Phoenix hits another 110-degree day and wildfires spread in California

AP News

Phoenix sizzled through its 31st consecutive day of at least 110 degrees Fahrenheit (43.3 Celsius) and other parts of the country grappled Sunday with record temperatures after a week that saw significant portions of the U.S. population subject to extreme heat.

Kristie Ebi, professor of global health and of environmental and occupational health sciences at the UW, is quoted.

Pages