• Adjunct Associate Professor, Global Health
  • Associate Professor, Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Adjunct Associate Professor, Health Metrics Sciences

Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation
2301 Fifth Ave., Suite 600
Seattle, WA 98121
United States

Phone Number: 
206-897-2800
Email: 
nickjk@uw.edu
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Biography 

Nicholas Kassebaum, MD, is an Adjunct Associate Professor in Health Metric Sciences at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) and an Associate Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine at University of Washington. He has been involved with the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study and the Cost-Effectiveness research teams since 2010 and now leads the GBD research team on maternal, neonatal, and child health (MNCH). In this role, Dr. Kassebaum researches the burden of disease and effectiveness of interventions for improving survival and health of women, children, and adolescents. He has a special interest in women’s health and equity, pregnancy health, and multiple child health issues including congenital birth defects, hemoglobinopathies, prematurity and low birth weight, child growth failure, anemia, oral and dental health, and neonatal complications arising from infections, jaundice, and asphyxia. 

Dr. Kassebaum earned his undergraduate degree from Macalester College in St. Paul, MN, his medical degree from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, TN, completed anesthesiology residency at the University of Washington, and a fellowship in pediatric anesthesiology at the Seattle Children’s Hospital. He practices clinically at Harborview Medical Center.

Education 
  • MD (Vanderbilt University)
  • BA (Macalester College)
Country Affiliations 
Languages 
  • Japanese
Health Topics 
  • Adult Mortality
  • Biostatistics
  • Burden of Disease
  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Causes of Death
  • Child and Adolescent Health (incl. Pediatrics)
  • Child Mortality
  • Chronic Disease (incl. Cardiovascular, Diabetes)
  • Clinical Mentoring
  • Education and Training
  • Epidemiology
  • Family Planning
  • Health Disparities
  • Health Economics
  • Health Outcomes
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Infectious Diseases (other than STDs)
  • Maternal Child Health (incl. Reproductive Health)
  • Maternal Mortality
  • Mortality
  • Non-Communicable Diseases
  • Nutrition
  • Nutrition, Clean Water, and Food Security
  • Obesity
  • Oral Health
  • Pain and Symptom Management
  • Quality Improvement
  • Research
  • STDs (other than HIV)
  • Surgery
DGH Centers, Programs and Initiatives and Affiliated Organizations 
Publications 

GBD 2015 Maternal Mortality Collaborators (Kassebaum NJ is corresponding author). Global, regional, and national maternal mortality, 1990-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015. Lancet. Oct 8, 2016. 388(10053):1775-1812. DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(16)31470-2.

GBD 2015 DALYs and HALE Collaborators (Kassebaum NJ is corresponding author). Global, regional, and national disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) for 315 diseases and injuries and healthy life expectancy (HALE) for 195 countries and territories, 1990-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015. Lancet. 2016 Oct 8;388(10053):1603-1658. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(16)31460-X.

NJ Kassebaum, R Lozano, SS Lim, CJL Murray. Setting maternal mortality targets for the SDGs – Author’s reply. Lancet. 2017 Feb 18;389(10070):697-698. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(17)30339-2.

GBD 2015 Oral and Dental Health Collaborators (Kassebaum NJ is corresponding author). Global, regional and national prevalence, incidence and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) for oral conditions for 195 countries, 1990-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors (GBD) 2015 Study. Journal of Dental Research. Feb 1, 2017, 96(4):380-7. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022034517693566

The Global Burden of Disease Child and Adolescent Health Collaboration. Child and Adolescent Health From 1990 to 2015Findings From the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors 2015 Study. JAMA Pediatr. 2017;171(6):573-592. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.0250