Want to submit your event or news story?

Use our contact form to send your information and someone will get back to you as soon as possible.

Contact Us

Department News

UW Research in Clinical Medicine Ranked No. 2 Globally

In the 2016 Academic Ranking of World Universities for clinical medicine and pharmacy, the University of Washington has moved up to No. 2 in the world (from No. 3 in 2015) and is now second to only Harvard University.

The list, published by the Shanghai Ranking Consultancy, evaluates more than 1,200 universities. Shanghai Ranking is recognized for basing its rankings on objective indicators, such as the number of alumni and staff who have won Nobel Prizes, highly cited researchers and publications in top medical journals.

SPH Close Up: Carey Farquhar

By 8:30 most mornings, Carey Farquhar has already exercised, dropped her kids at school and taken part in at least two calls with colleagues in Kenya. A ground-breaking HIV researcher and long-time mentor, she hopes to develop a more diverse student body as well as launch more fieldwork opportunities for students in Asia. She was recently named associate chair for academic programs in the Department of Global Health.

Research Passion: Promoting HIV testing within couples in Africa

SPH: UW Students Have Hard Conversations about Race & Disparity in London

Students share their experiences in a study abroad program examining health disparities in Great Britain in this School of Public Health news article. The program name, Dark Empire, refers to the shadow that existed after the fall of the British Empire and the health disparities seen today as a result of British imperialism. This is the program's 9th year and it is led by Adjunct Professor Clarence Spigner.

Department Part of Major Study to Test Antibiotics as a Treatment for Diarrheal Disease in High-Risk Children in Low Resource Settings

By Amelia Vader

Researchers at the University of Washington and Kenya Medical Research Institute are working to determine if antibiotics could help save thousands of children from dying of diarrheal disease thanks to a four-year $2.5 million grant from the World Health Organization.

The Antibiotics for Children with Severe Diarrhea (ABCD) Trial is the largest clinical trial addressing diarrhea management to date; and it will not only answer the question of the potential benefits of antibiotics it will also address any potential harm, such as antibiotic resistance.

In the Media

Seattle Times: Cuba Rediscovered: US Students Get Free Ride in Cuban Medical School

By Ángel González

Cuba’s renowned health-care system, which flourishes despite the country’s poverty, still has lessons to teach the world, experts say. Hundreds of U.S. students have attended medical school tuition-free in Cuba, including a UW grad who plans on returning home to practice in underserved communities in Kitsap County.

Assistant Professor Paul Drain is quoted.

Read the article

Yahoo: Mixed Report for Global Health Progress

By Mariëtte Le Roux

Paris (AFP) - The world has made progress in curbing infant mortality, stunted growth and other poverty-driven problems, while obesity, alcohol abuse and partner violence has risen, a major review of UN health goals said Wednesday.

"Progress varied widely," said The Lancet medical journal which published the assessment of 188 countries' progress since 1990, measured against the UN's Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Family Practice News: Oral HIV PrEP Also Protects Against Herpes

By Bruce Jancin

DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA – Oral antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) against HIV also reduces the risk of acquiring herpes simplex virus type 2, according to research presented at the 21st International AIDS Conference.

“Given the limited interventions for primary prevention of HSV-2, efficacy against HSV-2 provides additional benefit to oral PrEP,” observed Connie Celum, MD, professor of global health and medicine at the University of Washington, Seattle.

Popular Science: Why We Always Get Sick While Traveling -- and How to Prevent it

By Chelsea Harvey

Last weekend, bystanders watched as Hillary Clinton unsteadily left a Sept. 11 memorial service in New York City, stumbling as aides helped her into her waiting vehicle. Shortly thereafter, Clinton’s physician released a statement explaining that the Democratic presidential nominee had recently been diagnosed with pneumonia.

Stat: The Lab Breakthrough that Paved the Way for Today's Pricey Hepatitis C Cures

By Rebecca Robbins

In just the last few years, new medications have turned hepatitis C into a widely and quickly curable disease — for those who can afford it.

But the lesser-known origins of the story trace back to a 1990s laboratory invention that made it all possible. Now, two virologists who pioneered that pivotal development, and a drug researcher who created the first revolutionary drug, are being honored with one of the most prestigious awards in medical science.