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Department News

Jorge "Coco" Alarcon: Landscape Architecture & Mosquito-Borne Diseases

Student:  Jorge “Coco” Alarcon

Program: Master of Landscape Architecture, Global Health Certificate
Fellowship: Thomas Francis, Jr. Global Health Fellowship
Project Title: Green Spaces and Infectious Diseases, Strategies for Mosquito Control in Spaces
Location: Iquitos, Peru

Getting this support really encourages me to push boundaries of design and science, to create my own path, and to promote health in my field of architecture and landscape architecture.

Fitzpatrick Named Assistant Dean for Graduate Education at School of Public Health

Adjunct Research Professor Annette Fitzpatrick has been named the new SPH Assistant Dean for Graduate Education, overseeing the Office of Student Affairs, guiding curriculum changes, and creating partnerships across UW and the community, among other initiatives. Dr. Fitzpatrick is a Research Professor in the Departments Family Medicine, Epidemiology, and Global Health (adjunct) with expertise in aging and chronic disease focusing on hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and dementia in US and global settings. Congrats, Dr. Fitzpatrick!

New DEWORM3 Project Will Explore Integrated Approaches

Over 1.45 billion people, including 845 million children, in the world’s poorest communities are infected with soil-transmitted helminths (STH), commonly known as intestinal worms. Associate Professor Judd Walson, in collaboration with the Natural History Museum London and the University of Washington, has been awarded funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to test the feasibility of eliminating soil-transmitted helminths using intensified mass drug administration strategies.

In the Media

KOMO: Local Research Could Cure Zika Virus and the Common Cold

By Molly Shen

SEATTLE -- On the heels of the World Health Organization declaring a public health emergency related to the Zika virus, local scientists said they are already working on a cure. And if they're able to treat Zika, it could also mean a cure for viruses ranging from West Nile to Ebola, to the common cold.

Scientists at biotech company Kineta and the University of Washington are developing the compound. Just like antibiotics treat bacterial infections, their antiviral drug would fend off a range of viruses.