The latest news

Washington Tuberculosis Expert Receives Local Public Health Award

Masa Narita, MD, Adjunct Professor of Epidemiology and Global Health at the University of Washington School of Public Health, received the Noreen Harris Award for Excellence in Public Health Epidemiology for his work in tuberculosis (TB) surveillance and epidemiology. The award is presented annually by Public Health – Seattle & King County.

Dr. Narita is the TB disease control officer for King County in Washington state, and he has been at the helm of the Tuberculosis Control Program (TBCP) at Public Health – Seattle & King County for 12 years.

Politifact: Does Tuberculosis Top HIV/AIDS as the Deadlier Disease?

By John Greenburg

Among nations, the United States is the runaway leader in the money it spends on global health programs, and the looming question for advocates is what will happen under President Donald Trump and a Republican Congress. Nick Seymour, a Harvard junior volunteering at a health clinic in Mexico, argued for sustained spending.

Pisacano Leadership Foundation Names 2016 Pisacano Scholars

The Pisacano Leadership Foundation, the philanthropic arm of the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM), recently selected Brianne Huffstetler Rowan, 4th year medical student at the UW School of Medicine, as one of their 2016 Pisacano Scholars. These 5 scholars and medical students follow in the footsteps of 103 scholar alumni who are practicing physicians and 20 current scholars who are enrolled in medical schools or family medicine residency programs across the country.

Nature Research Honors Julie Overbaugh, PhD, for Lifetime of Mentoring

Julie Overbaugh, PhD, Affiliate Professor in the UW Department of Global Health, scientist and member at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and Endowed Chair of Graduate Education, received the lifetime achievement Nature Award for Mentoring in Science and a $10,000 prize in December. Nature hosts these annual awards to champion the importance of mentoring and inspiring a generation of young scientists.

Hutch News: On The Path to a New-Generation Malaria Vaccine

By Mary Engel

Researchers may be one step closer to a truly effective malaria vaccine, a new study suggests. A genetically modified malaria parasite worked as designed in its first human clinical trial, causing neither malaria nor serious safety problems in the 10 people who volunteered to be infected. It also stimulated an immune response that holds out promise of a more protective vaccine than the single candidate now in pilot studies