• Assistant Professor, Global Health
Elaine Nsoesie

2301 5th Avenue, Suite 600
Seattle, WA 98121
United States

Phone Number: 
206-897-3777
Email: 
en22@uw.edu
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Biography 

Dr. Elaine Nsoesie is an Assistant Professor of Global Health at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington. Previously, she was a postdoctoral research fellow at HealthMap, Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Nsoesie is interested in the use of statistical and computational approaches for public health surveillance. Her research is focused on the modeling of infectious diseases, and the use of emerging technologies and tools for improving understanding of disease spread and public health practice. Dr. Nsoesie also interested in health disparities, global health security and policy.

For more information about Dr. Nsoesie, visit her website 

Education 
  • PhD (Virginia Tech)
  • MS (Virginia Tech)
  • BS (University of Maryland)
Country Affiliations 
Languages 
  • French
Health Topics 
  • Disease Surveillance
  • Epidemiology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Informatics
Publications 

Henly S, Tuli G, Kluberg S, Hawkins JB, Nguyen Q, Anema A, Maharana A, Brownstein JS, Nsoesie EO (2017), “Disparities in Digital Reporting of Illness: A Demographic and Socioeconomic Assessment", Preventive Medicine: 101:18-22

Zinszer K, Morrison K, Brownstein JS, Marinho F, Santos AF, Nsoesie EO (2016), “Reconstruction of Zika virus introduction in Brazil," Emerging Infectious Diseases: DOI: 10.3201/eid2301.161274

Nsoesie EO, Kraemer MUG, Golding N, Pigott DM, Brady OJ, Moyes CL, Johansson MA, Gething
PW, Velayudhan R, Khan K, Hay SI, Brownstein JS (2016), "Global Distribution and Environmental Suitabil-
ity for Chikungunya Virus, 1952 to 2015," Eurosurveillance 21(20):pii=30234. doi http://dx.doi.org/10.2807/1560- 7917.ES.2016.21.20.30234

Santillana M, Nguyen AT, Dredze M, Paul MJ, Nsoesie EO, Brownstein JS (2015) "Combining Search, Social Media, and Traditional Data Sources to Improve Influenza Surveillance," PLos Computational Biology doi: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1004513