Master of Public Health

The Global Health MPH Program is an in-residence, full-time, day program where students complete required and elective coursework, a practicum, and a thesis as part of their course of study. Students move through the first year (late September -mid-June) as a cohort. All required coursework can, and should, be taken in the first year to allow for flexibility to to pursue practicum and thesis opportunities in the second year. Students have access to all University of Washington courses and are encouraged take advantage of classes in other departments. 

Select from the following:

Beginning in Autumn 2020, all MPH students in the School of Public Health will be required to take six courses (ideally in their first year) that make up the MPH common core curriculum:

  • Fundamentals of Public Health (PHI 511, autumn, 3 credits)
  • Analytical Skills for Public Health I (PHI 512, autumn, 7 credits)
  • Analytical Skills for Public Health II (PHI 513, winter, 3 credits)
  • Determinants of Health (PHI 514, winter, 3 credits)
  • Implementing Public Health Interventions, PHI 515, spring, 4 credits)
  • Public Health Practice (PHI 513, spring, 3 credits)

These courses will expose students to diverse perspectives of public health and give them an appreciation for those from different disciplinary backgrounds. Students can decide whether to take a practice or research route, but will be skilled in both areas. Instructor selection will take place in summer 2019; instructors will finalize the syllabi during the 2019-2020 school year. Click here for a pdf of of the six syllabi.     

The General Track provides a broad curriculum with a wide selection of courses and maximal flexibility to develop one’s own curricular direction. Students can focus on areas such as: program design and evaluation; implementation science; global mental health; maternal, child, and adolescent health; qualitative research; non-communicable diseases; tropical medicine, and others.

In addition to the MPH common core curriculum, General Track students will be required to complete the following.

  • G H 511, Problems in Global Health (autumn, 4 credits). Explores social, political, economic, environmental determinants of developing countries' health; traces development of societal responses to problems. Includes: origins of primary healthcare; child survival; traditional systems; population; water; sanitation; international agencies; impact of economic policies. Case study formulating pharmaceutical policy in a developing country.
  • G H 593, MPH Workshop (autumn, winter, and spring quarter of a students first year, 1 credit). A cohort-building course that provides students with an opportunity to share their expertise with one another and discuss global health issues that may not be covered in other coursework. Highlights of the course include presentations from fellow students, guest lecturers from various departments, and scholars who share their interdisciplinary, global perspectives, and expertise. Students are also invited to select topics and prepare student-led sessions. 
  • One course (minimum of three credits) with a G H prefix.

As well as

  • G H 531, Research and Evaluation Methods in Global Health (quarter TBD, 3-4 credits). Provides an overview of a range of evaluation and research designs used in global health. Students learn practical methodologies to obtain, validate, and analyze information regarding health status, services, and programs. Discusses usefulness, validity, limitation of vital records, health reports, household (and cluster) surveys, and qualitative methods.

​Or

  • G H 532, Responsible Conduct of Research: Global and Local (pre-autumn, two weeks in September, 3 credits). Prepares international and U.S. students to develop research proposals; conduct international and domestic field research; and present scholarly work.

The Health Metrics and Evaluation Track is for students who want to pursue careers addressing global health challenges by utilizing quantitative research, methods and modeling development, survey design and analysis, health systems and program evaluation, and policy analysis. Graduates of this track seek employment opportunities in the U.S. and globally with governmental agencies, non-governmental organizations, non-profits and research institutions.

In addition to the MPH common core curriculum, Health Metrics and Evaluation students will be required to complete the following.

  • G H 511, Problems in Global Health (autumn, 4 credits). Explores social, political, economic, environmental determinants of developing countries' health; traces development of societal responses to problems. Includes: origins of primary healthcare; child survival; traditional systems; population; water; sanitation; international agencies; impact of economic policies. Case study formulating pharmaceutical policy in a developing country.
  • GH 539, Methods, Tools, and Data for Global Health (pre-autumn, two weeks in September, 2 credits). Familiarizes students with current global health issues and their analytical challenges. Introduces analytical methodologies, quantitative concepts, statistical packages applied to global health challenges, and software used in health metrics and evaluations research. 
  • GH 590G, Global Burden of Disease (summer, 3 credits). This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts, technical components and quantitative methods used in the GBD Study.  This course focuses predominately on constructing aggregate measures such as Years Life Lost (YLL), Years Lived with Disability (YLD) and Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs). 
  • Three quarters of GH 592, HME Seminar (1 credit). The HME Track Seminar provides an opportunity for students to examine and discuss ongoing research within the field of global health. Each week, students evaluate a selected journal article about a current global health issue and discuss its research design, analytical methodologies, and policy implications. 

The University of Washington has a large number of graduate certificate options in many disciplines. Certificates generally consist of one to three required courses, a few elective courses, and often a capstone requirement, for a total of 15 credits. Certificates are designed to deepen and enhance the education of matriculated graduate and professional students outside of their degree requirements. A complete listing of graduate certificate programs can be found here. Below are commonly completed certificates by Global Health MPH students.

Global Health MPH Students are encouraged, and eligible, to take courses from any school or college within the University of Washington as long as the course is not fee-based, the student has met course prerequisites, and there is space in the class. The attached list of electives is a sampling of popular courses recommended by current and former students

PDF iconElective Courses of Interest to DGH students 2018_2019_2.pdf

The primary advantage of the concurrent degree option is that typically it allows the student to complete two degrees in less time than would be required by completing each degree separately. Some requirements, such as the thesis and some course requirements, can – with careful planning – often be met for both degrees by one product or activity. 

APPLICATION PROCESS

  • Concurrent students generally apply to the Global Health General Track for maximum flexibility but applying to other tracks is possible.
  • Most concurrent students complete the partner program first and then complete their MPH. This is ideal as the practicum and thesis can then directly follow MPH coursework. 
  • Concurrent applicants must submit an application for the MPH program even if already enrolled in the Graduate School. 
    • Concurrent applicants must be sure to complete the Identify Concurrent Degree section of the application and current status in respect to that program (This is the only way the MPH program can identify an applicant as a concurrent degree applicant) as well as indicate if they already have GRE scores on file at the UW from a previous application.
  • The below are concurrent degrees most often pursued in conjunction with a Global Health MPH, other concurrent options are also possible.

MD/MPH CONCURRENT DEGREE (FOR UW MEDICAL STUDENTS) 

Students in this track complete one full year (three academic quarters) of MPH-only coursework after the second or third year of medical school. International work occurs in summers, between rotations, in specialized rotations, or by taking time off. MD students at other institutions should apply to the General Track

FOR UW SCHOOL OF MEDICINE STUDENTS

MPH/DNP-PH

The concurrent Doctorate in Nursing Practice in Population Health (DNP-PH) and Master of Public Health in Global Health Degree (MPH) is a three- to four-year program that aims to expand the skills of public health nurses and nurse scholars to work in partnership with populations and health systems to ultimately improve access to health care and help achieve health for all. Applicants must submit an application for each program, either concurrently or to the second program during their first year of study. Both programs must offer admission before admission into the concurrent degree program is granted.  For more information, contact asknursing@uw.edu.

MPH/MSW

This concurrent degree offering by the School of Social Work and the Department of Global Health allows students to complete degree requirements for MSW and MPH degrees in approximately three years. These degrees would require four years of academic work if earned separately. Prospective students should apply for the MSW first and then apply for the MPH during their first year in the MSW program. For more information, contact J'May Rivara at jbr@u.washington.edu from the School of Social Work. 

MPH/MPA

This concurrent degree offering by the Evans School of Public Affairsand the Department of Global Health allows students to complete degree requirements for MPA and MPH degrees in approximately three years. Prospective students are advised to apply for the MPA first and then apply for the MPH during their first year in the MPA program. For more information, contact ghprog@uw.edu to learn more about the Global Health MPH and the Evans School Recruitment Manager at evansrec@u.washington.edu to learn more about MPA.

MAIS/MPH

This concurrent degree program is intended mainly for students who are planning careers in management or policy aspects of international health. The two degrees can be completed in approximately three years. For more information, contact the Jackson School of International Studies Office of Student Services.

MPH/PHD ANTHROPOLOGY

This concurrent degree program offers an interdisciplinary curriculum in the fields of public health and anthropology leading to a MPH in Global Health and PhD in Anthropology. This offering is designed to prepare professionals who will function in multidisciplinary health settings in the areas of teaching, research, administration, planning, and policy development and implementation. Students admitted into the concurrent degree program will be those who have identified a strong commitment to devoting their careers to innovative approaches to solving the world’s most pressing global health issues. For more information, contact James Pfeiffer at jamespf@u.washington.edu.